Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Working Papers’ Category

Bustanul Arifin

June 10, 2012

 

To download this file, please click the following link:

2012-Arifin-Increasing Sustainability and Competitiveness of Agricultural Commodities

Read Full Post »

Bustanul Arifin, et.al

2009

 

To download this file, please click the following link:

2009-ICONE-Overview of Biofules in Asia and Latin Amerika-03971

Read Full Post »

Bustanul Arifin

October 31, 2009

 

The rice industry in Indonesia is definitely the largest industry in the country, employing more than 12 million people in the rice farming and other related small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in rural areas. There is no other industry that as big as the rice industry, counting the upstream in the farm and downstream in rice milling. In addition, the rice industry is very political where all political leaders in Indonesia, from President Soekarno, President Soeharto, to the current President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono have used the approach of food security in the political and economic development strategies. Consequently, the economic decision in running rice industry often intersects with political decision or government intervention. The society at large keeps open eyes very closely and put a very high expectation on the success of any government programs related to rice industry or food security for the country.

 

To download this file, please click the following link:

2009-Arifin-Roles of Private Sector of Indonesian Rice Industry

Read Full Post »

Bustanul Arifin, et.al

2008

 

To download this file, please click the following link:

2008-ICONE-Overview of Agriculture Sector in Asia and Latin America-1617

Read Full Post »

Bustanul Arifin

February 6, 2008

 

To download this file, please click the following link:

2008-Arifin-Non State Regulation of Coffee Trade in Indonesia

Read Full Post »

Bustanul Arifin, Brent Swallow, and Richard Coe

2008

 

Abstract

A wide range of policy instruments have been devised and applied to support the goals of sustainable forestry management. Community forestry programs can contain elements of several of these instruments. This paper considers the design of community forestry contracts in Indonesia. In the research site, community forestry contracts are contracts between the Forestry Department and community groups that provide group members with time-bound leasehold rights to protection forests, provided that farmers abide by specified land-use restrictions and pay any required fees. Farmers perceive that the contracts represent a bundle of restrictions and instruments, some of which are explicitly stated in the contract and others that are implied by the contract. Conjoint analysis was used to quantify farmers’ tradeoffs among the explicit and implicit attributes of the contracts. The results of bivariate and ordered logit models show that farmers are most concerned about the length of the contract, and surprisingly unconcerned about requirements on tree density and species composition. An implicit attribute, greater access to forestry and agroforestry extension, emerged as an important implicit attribute. The results imply that farmers in this part of Indonesia would be willing to abide by fairly strict limitations on land use, provided that they can be assured of long-term rights to the planted trees.

 

Keywords

Community forestry programs, community forestry contracts, conjoint analysis, Indonesia; ordered logit

 

To download this file, please click the following link:

2008-Arifin et al-Conjoint Analysis-ICRAF WP63

Read Full Post »

Bustanul Arifin

 

August 12-18, 2006

 

Abstract

This study analyzes transaction costs occurred in the existing set-up of upstreamdownstream relations and reward mechanisms of the watershed services in Sumatra, Indonesia. The rewards are manifested through property right reforms in terms of “recognition” and “loss of fear of eviction” among local communities to utilize land within the “protection forest”, such as implemented under the community-based forestry management (CBFM) policy. The study sites of Sumber Jaya watershed in Sumatra, Indonesia has been notoriously known as a benchmark for conflict of watershed functions between the state and the society, and among stakeholders such as coffee growers, domestic water-users, hydroelectric power company, etc. Estimated transaction cost to implement the rewards is US$ 55 per household, a relatively high cost for rural standards. The component consists of costs of searching information (70%), organizing the group (27%), and enforcement of working rules and regulations (3%), implying a non-efficient economic organization of the society and non-clear policy structures at regional and national level. Roles of intermediaries such as NGO (national and international) are extremely important to implement the negotiation support system and develop multi-stakeholders strategy to reduce transaction costs, especially to ensure conflict resolutions, improve trusts and shared responsibility to achieve more sustainable resource management.

 

To download this file, please click the following link:

2006-Arifin-Transaction Cost Analysis

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »